What homepage?

Question

WHEN I OPEN MY INT EXPLORER HOME PAGE ( WHICH IS YAHOO.COM) I GET THE PAGE CANNOT BE DISPLAYED/DNS ERROR MESSAGE. BUT THEN I DO THE REPAIR OPTION OF LAN, AND THEN I CAN ACCESS MY HOME PAGE OR ANYTHING ELSE. SOMETHING ABOUT RUNNING THE REPAIR OPTION CLEARS UP THE PROBLEM AND I CAN BROWSE THE INTERNET. ALSO EVERYTIME I DO THE REPAIR OPTION, I GET THIS ERROR MESSAGE- THE FOLLOWING STEPS OF REPAIR OPTION FAILED-FLUSHING THE ARP CACHE. THIS HAPPENS EVERY TIME I DO THIS. WHAT COULD BE THE PROBLEM AND PLEASE GIVE ME SOME STEPS TO SOLVE THIS PROBLEM OR TELL ME WHERE TO LOOK FOR INFO. ON THIS. IT IS BECOMING A REAL PROBLEM FOR ME AND IS HAPPENING MORE AND MORE OFTEN. THANK YOU SO MUCH.

Answer

This question was answered on December 16, 2003. Much of the information contained herein may have changed since posting.

It seems to me like the probable answer is in your question :0) Looks to be like an outdated cache issue Delete your browser's cache everytime you close it For IE all you do is right click the big E on your desktop and go to Internet Properties, then delete cookies, delete files, and clear your history I am assuming that you are running IE 6.0.

ARP stands for Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) and it is a protocol for mapping an Internet Protocol address (IP address) to a physical machine address that is recognized in the local network For example, in IP Version 4, the most common level of IP in use today, an address is 32 bits long In an Ethernet local area network, however, addresses for attached devices are 48 bits long (The physical machine address is also known as a Media Access Control or MAC address.) A table, usually called the ARP cache, is used to maintain a correlation between each MAC address and its corresponding IP address ARP provides the protocol rules for making this correlation and providing address conversion in both directions

So if the above mentioned does not resolve your problem then there might be some network problems The way ARP works ~~~> When an incoming packet destined for a host machine on a particular local area network arrives at a gateway, the gateway asks the ARP program to find a physical host or MAC address that matches the IP address The ARP program looks in the ARP cache and, if it finds the address, provides it so that the packet can be converted to the right packet length and format and sent to the machine If no entry is found for the IP address, ARP broadcasts a request packet in a special format to all the machines on the LAN to see if one machine knows that it has that IP address associated with it A machine that recognizes the IP address as its own returns a reply so indicating ARP updates the ARP cache for future reference and then sends the packet to the MAC address that replied

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Author

Posted by Student of Katharine Gibbs School - New York on December 16, 2003